Offshore Alaska Drilling: Private Effort versus Regulatory Constraints

See on Scoop.itNature + Economics

“Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chuckchi Seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive… part of the complexcity is the distant Arctic location and the short summer exploraion and drilling window…. “

 

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

 

– See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

 

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

– See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

– See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

– See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

MJP EcoArchives‘s insight:

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

 

– See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

The writer mightn’t have had this in mind, but this overview of Royal Dutch Shell’s presnce in the Artic is interesting to anyone who follows this sort of thing.

The question of enviornmetnal protection versus economic developement is played out so sharkly in the areana of the Arctic. So much to gain, so much to loose and the stakeholders are far wider than the geographic area. Some say it’s a humanity-scale debate.

There are really interesting questions here – if we can get that much economic return and energy from the area, should we be enough to overwhelme the environmental dangeres?

Now, Shell has a pretty good enviornmental reccord and has spent billions in going through tht proper regulatory channels and putting all enviornmental protection practices it can into place. But we all admit we don’t quite know all the ins and outs of energy extraction in the Arctic.

And lastly, if we have regulations in place to manage this conflict between Nature and Economcis in the arctic, should we step back and let companies like Shell porcees through and let the jury decided the outcome according to pre-established parameters. Or should we take extra-special consideration because it’s the Arctic and start the process all over.

I’m not sure what I think, but I don’t like the idea of Clean Air vlolations being used for anything other than Clean Air violations. And I like even playing-fields. If Shell can get through our regulations and requirements and maintain an effective balance between protecting Nature and returning Econmic value, then that’s only fair, right?

Don’t hate the player, hate they game? But it could mean it’s time to change the game….

See on www.masterresource.org

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